A feature by Susan Larson on the book in The New Orleans Advocate. Come out to my events tonight at Octavia Books and tomorrow night at Lil Dizzy’s.

blackhistoryalbum
blackhistoryalbum:


The “White” Slave Children of New Orleans | 1860sSlave children Wilson, Charley, Rebecca & Rosa, 1863. Former slaves of mixed race ancestry. White Slaves Series 2 of 5
These cards were sold in 1863-1864 to help raise money to pay for schools for emancipated slaves in New Orleans. The organizers realized that the sympathies that people would have for children who looked white but had been slaves was going to be greater than the sympathy they might have for black-skinned children.

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Georgetown University Professor Adam Rothman has written a fantastic book on this topic that will be published in Spring 2015.  The tragic legacy of slavery in New Orleans and the city’s racial complexity also shaped the events of 1870 that I recreate in my new book The Great New Orleans Kidnapping Case (Oxford University Press, October 2014).

blackhistoryalbum:

The “White” Slave Children of New Orleans | 1860s

Slave children Wilson, Charley, Rebecca & Rosa, 1863. Former slaves of mixed race ancestry. White Slaves Series 2 of 5

These cards were sold in 1863-1864 to help raise money to pay for schools for emancipated slaves in New Orleans. The organizers realized that the sympathies that people would have for children who looked white but had been slaves was going to be greater than the sympathy they might have for black-skinned children.

Follow us on Tumblr  Pinterest  Facebook  Twitter

Georgetown University Professor Adam Rothman has written a fantastic book on this topic that will be published in Spring 2015.  The tragic legacy of slavery in New Orleans and the city’s racial complexity also shaped the events of 1870 that I recreate in my new book The Great New Orleans Kidnapping Case (Oxford University Press, October 2014).

Kirkus Reviews interviewed me about how I came to discover the story of Mollie Digby’s kidnapping and the historical significance.  From the piece:

"In 1870 New Orleans, two Afro-creole women were accused of kidnapping Mollie Digby, a child of Irish immigrants. The unprecedented amount of press and political attention the case received had much to do with its timing—under the governorship of Henry Warmoth, the recent empowerment of African-Americans in Louisiana bore intense scrutiny, making it one of the ‘most critical moments in American history.’

'The story had become so entangled with Reconstruction politics, that I realized that it had real historical significance,”Ross says. “In part, by demonstrating the way in which a kidnapping, which in a crime-filled city might have been just another Page 3 story, could be blown into something much larger by the fearsome politics of Reconstruction.'

By analyzing this case, which inexplicably slipped through the cracks, Ross augments the historical narrative on race with a sliver of hope, challenging the backlash against the Reconstruction movement.”

Click the link above for the whole feature.